Temporary Pavilion for Healthcare Workers / Revolution

Revolution
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Temporary Pavilion for Healthcare Workers (TPHW) is a modular temporary housing project created by the Mexican architecture & technology office Revolution in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, with the support of local and global companies as donors and Franco-Mexican Chamber of Commerce & Industry, National Importers and Exporters of Forest Products Association and National Suppliers of the Wood and Furniture Industry Association as allies.

In many cities hundreds of Covid-19 caring healthcare workers are sleeping in their cars or other precarious facilities after finishing their shifts, trying to avoid going home or taking public transportation and exposing their families and communities to contagion.

Revolution has designed a module built from prefabricated pieces of wood and biodegradable plastic that houses a bedroom, a shower, a sink, a toilet, a chlorinated water tank, and a solar/electric heater in 7 square meters. The modules are affordable, easy to assemble, and can be recycled or stored after sanitization for use in later emergencies.

This modular pavilion is ideal for outdoor installation, in empty parking lots of hospitals buildings for example. The design intends to offer natural light, privacy, and safe, dour, and meditative interior space in response to the physical end emotional needs of exhausted healthcare workers fighting against the Covid-19 pandemic.

Revolution has a special interest in emergency architecture and affordable micro-housing in emerging countries. Among their main projects are The People's Tower (a critical exercise for the development of affordable housing in the heart of Mexico City’s financial district) and the master plan for the construction of temporary housing for those affected by the September 2017 8.1 earthquakes in Ocuilan, Mexico.

The first pavilion has been donated to the Red Cross’s Central Hospital in Mexico City.

Temporary Pavilion for Healthcare Workers / Revolution

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